[SoundStudies] Latest Updates from "Sounding Out!" (blog/online discussion on sound)

Lynda Paul lynda.paul at yale.edu
Sat Jan 18 20:35:49 EST 2014


Dear all,

See below for details on what's happening these days with a really 
elaborate and
interesting sound studies blog/online forum.

Best,

Lynda

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Welcome to the latest update of Sounding Out!(soundstudiesblog.com), an
informative online discussion about the role of sound and listening in
contemporary culture.

This January finds Sounding Out! celebrating the beginning of a wonderful new
era with a move to a TWO POSTS A WEEK format! We are thrilled to welcome media
scholar Neil Verma (Harper-Schmidt Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of
Chicago and author of Theater of the Mind: Imagination, Aesthetics, and
American Radio Drama) to Team SO! as SCMS/ASA Special Editor.  Neil is 
curating
a cadre of guest editors who will tune our dear readers into new channels of
sound exploration, particularly in regards to issues surrounding media and
mediation.  Thursday's stream will guarantee you the same powerful guiding
interest in the politics and sociality of sound, while simultaneously
amplifying new and exciting areas.  Just a hint of what's on tap for 
Spring?  A
February forum on dubstep guest edited by Justin Burton (Rider), a Tom 
McEnaney
(Cornell)-curated segment in March on Latin American radio, and posts on Lou
Reed's voice by Jake Smith (Northwestern) and Tim Anderson (Old Dominion) in
April.

Stay Tuned!

This week we bring you two wonderful posts on the materiality of the voice,
Monday's by scholar and activist Nancy Morales (Center for the Study of
Culture, Race and Ethnicity, Ithaca College) and Thursday's by cinema scholar
Murray Pomerance (Ryerson University).  Nancy's post, "Óyeme Voz: U.S. Latin@
& Immigrant Communities Re-Sound Citizenship and Belonging,"  examines how
immigrant communities utilize the sounds of their voices as a critical part of
their activism, particularly through innovative digital forms of documentation
and circulation.  By insisting they be heard as themselves and on their own
terms, Morales argues that sound "exerts an impactful and profoundly material
agency" for vulnerable immigrant communities.  Nancy's research is 
published in
both English and Spanish (translation by Martha Unzueta-Perez), and we 
hope will
encourage and facilitate more submissions in multiple languages to 
Sounding Out!
as well as more posts-in-translation.  Please spread the word and share the
post!

Thursday's post by Murray Pomerance brings Sounding Out!'s leg of our 
legendary
six-month "From Mercury to Mars" confab with the good folks at Antenna to a
rousing close with a philosophical exploration of how Orson Welles mobilized
his voice to various powerful effects, reconstructing the process-- indeed the
breath-laden labor--through which Welles's voice came to be a key media
soundmark via the radio.  Check out "From Mercury to Mars: Vox Orson" for
resonantly imaged answers to some (and please excuse the pun) deep questions
about Welles, namely, what is "Orson Welles?s voice, not what he says, not
what he means, not who he is pretending to be, but that instrumentation he
cannot prevent himself from employing except by silence . . .? What is the
voice which one takes for granted in quoting his dialogue, as though what he
says were equivalent to his saying it?"

Who knows?  Sounding Out! knows. . . and now twice as much!

Keep listening,
J. Stoever-Ackerman, Editor-in-Chief

---

We also encourage you to review 2013's excellent posts and podcasts. . 
.here are
the top in each category, congratulations to our authors and makers:

TOP 5 POSTS OF 2013
An Ear-splitting Cry: Gender, Performance, and Representations of Zaghareet in
the U.S. by Meghan Drury

To Sir, With Ratchety Love: Listening to the (Dis)Respectability Politics of
Rachel Jeantel by Regina Bradley

Love and Hip Hop: (Re)Gendering The Debate Over Hip Hop Studies by Travis Gosa

I Like the Way You Rhyme, Boy: Hip Hop Sensibility and Racial Trauma in Django
Unchained by Regina Bradley

Toward a Practical Language for Live Electronic Performance by Primus Luta



TOP 3 PODCASTS OF 2013
Sounding Out! Podcast #12: Animal Transcriptions: Listening to the Lab of
Ornithology
Sounding Out! Podcast #10: Interview with Theremin Master Eric Ross
Sounding Out! Podcast #11: Recapping SoundBox Project #Tweetasound


--Jennifer Stoever-Ackerman, Editor-in-Chief

--

Sounding Out! is a twice weekly online publication, a networked academic
archive, and a dynamic group platform bringing together sound studies 
scholars,
sound artists and professionals, and readers interested in the cultural 
politics
of sound and listening.  Every Monday, our writers offer well-researched,
well-written, and accessible interventions in sound studies, directing the
field?s energy toward the social, cultural, and political aspects of sound
and listening, particularly their differential construction of and material
impacts on variously positioned bodies.



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