<div dir="ltr">Hi Sound Studies Readers, <div><br></div><div>Just a quick announcement to let those interested know that the Music Department will host ethnomusicologist J. Martin Daughtry this Friday, 17 February, as part of our Guest Lecture Series. See below for more information on his talk &quot;Atmospheric Pressures: Reflections on Voice in the Anthropocene.&quot; </div><div><br></div><div>All best, </div><div>Mary</div><div><div><br></div><div><div class="gmail_quote">---------- Forwarded message ----------<br><br><br>






<div lang="EN-US" link="blue" vlink="purple">
<div class="m_-485154044842904536m_7357626863348730374m_-2372162206241465808m_-1633608520104547759WordSection1">
<p class="MsoNormal">Dear all,<u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">We are most pleased to welcome ethnomusicologist J. Martin Daughtry to our Guest Lecture Series this Friday, 17 February at 1:30 pm in 106 Stoeckel Hall. Details of what promises to be a very exciting talk are below.<u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">The Department of Music acknowledges the generous support of the
<span style="color:black">Edward J. and Dorothy Clarke Kempf Fund at Yale University for assistance with this series.<u></u><u></u></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="color:black"><u></u> <u></u></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="color:black"><img width="430" height="250" id="m_-485154044842904536m_7357626863348730374m_-2372162206241465808m_-1633608520104547759Picture_x0020_1" src="cid:image001.jpg@01D28616.A9CD4410"></span><span style="color:black"><u></u><u></u></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Atmospheric Pressures: Reflections on Voice in the Anthropocene<u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">From the standpoint of music studies, the relationship between voice and air is one of figure to ground or event to medium. In comparison to the voice, in other words, the air appears
 inert, transparent, and theoretically uninteresting. However, in our current era of global warming and rising CO2 emissions, air has become front-page news. What insights can we gain from turning the tables on the voice and taking air seriously? This talk
 brings music studies into conversation with recent writings on climate change to form a new framework for understanding singing and other vocal emissions in the anthropocene.  <u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><b><span style="font-size:9.5pt">J. Martin Daughtry</span></b><span style="font-size:9.5pt"> is an associate professor of ethnomusicology at New York University. He teaches and
 writes on acoustic violence; voice; listening; jazz in New York; air; Russian-language sung poetry; and the auditory imagination.
</span><u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:14.4pt">
<span style="font-size:9.5pt"> </span><u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial">
<u></u> <u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><u></u> <u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Rebekah Ahrendt<u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Assistant Professor<u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Department of Music<u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Yale University<u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><i><a href="https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.brienne.org_&amp;d=CwMFAg&amp;c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&amp;r=KDgThrrJB_LtyFUZ0U6mM9F9G8UrJtzv9uesOq-eO4g&amp;m=62uLzkKgePZRiRVVfkUZB6FTn5ox8vvGQgKVZFiLLcw&amp;s=YtDpveFoBgL7mfqrMhLuVk8-bcIBTwu_Sk1zHNYYbNY&amp;e=" target="_blank">Signed, Sealed, &amp; Undelivered</a><u></u><u></u></i></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><u></u> <u></u></p>
</div>
</div>

<br>______________________________<wbr>_________________<br>
music-wips mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:music-wips@mailman.yale.edu" target="_blank">music-wips@mailman.yale.edu</a><br>
<a href="http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/music-wips" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://mailman.yale.edu/mailma<wbr>n/listinfo/music-wips</a><br></div><br></div></div></div>