<div dir="ltr"><h3 class="gmail-iw"><span name="Winston Lin" class="gmail-gD"></span> </h3><div class="gmail-gK"><br></div><div class="gmail-gK">Hi Folks,<br><br></div><div class="gmail-ajy" tabindex="0">This Friday, Winston Lin will talk on:<span class="gmail-hb"></span></div><table class="gmail-cf gmail-adz" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td class="gmail-ady"></td></tr></tbody></table><div id="gmail-:334" class="gmail-ii gmail-gt gmail-adP gmail-adO"><div id="gmail-:335" class="gmail-a3s gmail-aXjCH gmail-m15a0f2f1297fca23">
<br>
&quot;Agnostic Notes on Regression Adjustments to Experimental Data:<br>
Reexamining Freedman’s Critique&quot;<br>
<br>
This talk will be mostly based on my 2013 Annals of Applied Statistics<br>
paper, which reexamines David Freedman&#39;s critique of ordinary least<br>
squares regression adjustment in randomized experiments.<br>
<br>
Random assignment is intended to create comparable treatment and<br>
control groups, reducing the need for dubious statistical models.<br>
Nevertheless, researchers often use linear regression models to adjust<br>
for random treatment-control differences in baseline characteristics.<br>
The classic rationale, which assumes the regression model is true, is<br>
that adjustment tends to reduce the variance of the estimated<br>
treatment effect. In contrast, Freedman used a randomization-based<br>
inference framework to argue that under model misspecification, OLS<br>
adjustment can lead to increased asymptotic variance, invalid<br>
estimates of variance, and small-sample bias. My paper shows that in<br>
sufficiently large samples, those problems are either minor or easily<br>
fixed. Neglected parallels between regression adjustment in<br>
experiments and regression estimators in survey sampling turn out to<br>
be very helpful for intuition.<br>
<br>
Winston Lin (Ph.D., Statistics, UC Berkeley, 2013) is an adjunct<br>
associate research scholar in the Department of Political Science at<br>
Columbia University.<br>
<br><br>See you Friday at 11am in the Stat&#39;s classroom.<br><br>Regards,<br>sekhar</div></div></div>